Archive for August, 2011

22
Aug
11

THE SPARKLE THAT FEEDS

Here is an art review I wrote a little bit ago. I waited to publish it on my site to give enough time for eReivew to the get the press out.
Hope you enjoy!
By Darin M. White May 13, 2011

A review of the spring Bread and Glitter journal release exhibition

ChrisBohatyritz2
Chris Bohatyritz, “Untitled,” acrylic on canvas, 2010-11. Image: courtesy of the artist
Monarch Gallery
Kansas City, Missouri
April 8 — May 13, 2011

Because of the fact that our oldest daughter had a sleep over to get ready for that night, we arrived late from Lawrence, Kansas, to the exhibition party, spurred on by our collective interest in art and an invitation. (My wife Shannon was included in this issue of Bread and Glitter). Bread and Glitter is very recent, well-thought, and well-written ‘zine journal covering art, aesthetics, deep thoughts, and various takes on faith. I have an insatiable diet for seeing art lately. Is it that “art” has increased in quality, or have I become a better viewer? Whatever the answer, my wife, our 10-month-old daughter, and I entered the room about the time when the DJ’s bass kicked in and we could feel our hearts bumping to the beat. The scene took me back to the days when we threw raves in the lunchroom of my family’s manufacturing company.

StuartBury_BreadandGlitterVol1Issue2
Stuart Bury, “Take an Axe to Fear!” cover art illustration for “Bread and Glitter” Volume 1, Issue 2, 2011. Image: courtesy of the artist

Ryan LaFerney, founder and co-editor of Bread and Glitter, which also has an online component, greeted us and graciously provided a run-down of the show, apologizing for the intensity of the sound. This is the B & G Volume 1, Issue 2 Spring Release party. Beyond a party, beyond an exhibition, there is a sense of community in this space called the Monarch Gallery on the first floor of an eight-story brick building on Main Street in Kansas City, Missouri.

Shannon pointed out the fresh-baked bread positioned on a pedestal, displayed as art with a collection of glitter and a small cup of honey. As we looked around the gallery amidst the flashing lights and thumping sounds, we saw additional beacons of bread lifted up to art status and purposed by glitter. Food-for-art, the art of food — how ever it is thought of, is something I think about often.

Katherine O’Hara, who acted as co-curator of the evening’s event, stated she was very pleasantly pleased with the exhibition, which was based on an open-ended general call. In my experience, this strategy can open the door to a potential madhouse — with a plethora of miscellaneous art hung salon-style and crammed so closely together that your eyes beg for mercy. Merciful it was, though, as we were not subjected to an overload of art, but with a variety of thought-provoking, fascinating, and even humorous works.

I was already familiar with many of the artists and have even shown their work in a flash space in Lawrence, Kansas. The talent oozes and the works delight. Being a sculptor and typically drawn to this work like a magnet, I sauntered over to Christina Dostaler‘s piece which looked like a May-day basket in filled with all sorts of edible goodies. I chewed on the luscious colors forms and shapes, but was reminded by my daughter that we should continue to move if we intended to take in the entire exhibition. We enjoyed the miniature and colorful weblike drawings of Lori Bury (whose husband Stuart Bury drew the cartoon for the cover of this B & G issue); her well-thought quintuple arrangement looked like a beautiful happy accident of bright spills and connecting DNA drawings.

ChristinaDostaler_IHopeIHavePotential
Christina Dostaler, installation view of “I Hope I Have Potential,” acrylic on Mylar, monofilament, and plastic, 2010. Image: courtesy of the artist

I was intrigued by Chris Bohatyritz‘s work, especially an untitled painting that reminded me of a monotype plate, with translucent reddish-brown spread across it with a pallet knife, topped with an explosion of small brilliant bright colorful strokes floating and flittering in and out directing themselves in shapes. At the bottom right of the painting peeking out from behind the swaths is a dog with droopy ears and lonesome eyes that looks up and out over the shoulder of the viewer as if he wishes to be somewhere else.

LoriBury_Detail1
Lori Bury, detail of set of four “Untitled” drawings, mixed media, 2011. Image: courtesy of the artist

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ChrisBohatyritz2detail
Chris Bohatyritz, detail from “Untitled,” acrylic on canvas, 2010-11. Image: courtesy of the artist

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AmandaBowles_QuietUtterance
Amanda Elise Bowles, still from “Quiet Utterance/Stolen Breath,” video on DVD, 2010. Image: courtesy of the artist

Linnea Gabriella Spransy had a variety of beautiful portraits on paper, which shows her talent to draw from life and to handle any medium/style, as the majority of her current work is completely abstract. I passed by Amanda Elise Bowles‘s video installation Quiet Utterance/Stolen Breath and realized that this wasn’t the time that I would be allowed to sit and contemplate the conceptual observations that she has made. Later, I spent some time with the Bread and Glitter issue itself and read more about her work, wishing I was able to see the installation again. I was drawn to the use of salt-encrusted bricks and the use of breath as a medium.

Ben Jones_Jeremiah
Ben Jones, “Jeremiah,” woodcut on paper, 2009. Image: courtesy of the artist

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JaneSheldon_TrustingType
Jane Sheldon, installation view of “The Trusting Type,” acrylic on paper, 2011. Image: courtesy of the artist

Instead, however, for this moment I took in Ben Jones‘s large woodblock prints and came back by again to see Jeremiah, with the strong contrast of black and white and the fascinating comedy. I circled back and took some time to study Jane Sheldon‘s paintings (or should they be called drawings)? They are stunningly awkward, but in a way that makes you like them all the more. Her use of text is interesting and somewhat left to the viewers’ imagination, as in The Trusting Type wherein she paints over the majority of the words; some are revealed as though through white-out from beyond the shoulder of the individual portrayed. I can make out “I’m normally the Trusting type…” and a few other words, but it seems as if it really isn’t the words that are important but the mood that the image creates. Again, these works by Sheldon like many of their counterparts are colorful, and after a long winter of drab, this glimmering viewing seems to be just the food I need.

Note:
The exhibition also included work by Wen Dan-Lin, Christina Lenert, Amanda Monson, Lizeth Niño, Brendan O’Shaughnessy, and Michael Powell. Jake Myska is also co-editor of Bread and Glitter.

Original article in:

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